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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
. narrator: malaysia is a country which is part peninsula and part island. and is farore developed than urallyiverocietyays. lyet,ike id is siking. and malaysia, which has hadn remarkable economic growthike id over the past 40 years, is also home to a variety of ethnic and religious groups. approximately 60% of the population is malay; 30%, ethnic chinese; and just under ten percent are of indian descent. let's look at how malaysia has worked to achieve a balance between the different ethnic groups with its mticultural society as it moves through the 21st century. malaysia is at the crossroads of maritime trade one hundred years ago, d ariait was even reo. under british colonial rule, cultural exchanges between many of the wod's peoples flourished on this peninsula. about 180 miles south of kuala lumpur, the nation's capital, lies the village of rengit in the southwest part of the state of johor. nagata junji is a geographer who is studying how different ethnic groups mingle in malaysia. ethnic makeup varies by region. this village is about 80% malay and 20% chinese. ( women laughing )
sits right at the tip of the peninsula of malaysia. it's kind of in between the south china sea as well as the indian ocean. a lot of ships that want to go from the pacific ocean to the indian ocean, they all have to come down through singapore and then cross over the other... to the other side. in that sense, its location is favorable. but it also has a natural harbor with nice deep water, and that has facilitated its port activities. narrator: the port is closely integrated with singapore's changi airport, asia's second-busiest. here, freight is exchanged between air and sea. but for such a busy place, singapore is quite small-- just about 400 square miles, only about a quarter the size of rhode island. more than four million people are packed into this tiny island state. 76% are ethnic chinese, 14% are malay and about eight percent are indian. ( indianusic playing ) singapore has a long tradition as a base for foreign traders. its can be seenr history in the architectural reminders of its days as a british colony. that tradition continues with singapore serving as a popular location
, but 30 years after the program began, malaysia's current leader says new lessons need to be learned. nhk world's nabila nishaa reports. >> reporter: mohammed took office in 1981. the charismatic leader governed malaysia for more than 20 years. his era was defined by rapid economic growth. he launched the look east policy in 1982. it saw young malaysians travel to japan to learn new technologies and management skills. about 14,000 people have taken part. a seminar in kuala lumpur on wednesday marked the program's 30th anniversary. its sponsors included a group that promotes economic cooperation between malaysia and japan. the 500 attendees included senior government and corporate officials. prime minister najt razia indicated the look east policy would continue. >> we need more investments from abroad. not just investment, any investment, but investment with technology, with more knowledge, more expertise. >> reporter: about 400 malaysians continue to come to japan every year under the look east policy. but with japan's economy barely growing, the number of applicants has declined. other
to balinese culture. they have figured that one out. narrator: malaysia is a country which is parteninsula and part island. and is farore developed than culturallyiverocietysia.yet,iked is siking. malaysia, which has had remarkable economic growth over the past 40 years, is also home to a variety of ethnic and religious groups. approximately 60% of the population is malay; 30%, ethnic chinese; and just under ten percent are of indian descent. let's look at how malaysia has worked to achieve a balance between the different ethnic groups with its mticultural society as it moves through the 21st century. malaysia is at the crossroads of maritime trade one hundred years ago, d ariait was even reo. under british colonial rule, cultural exchangesetween many of the wod's peoples flourished on this peninsula. about 180 miles south of kuala lumpur, the nation's capital, lies the village of rengit in the southwest part of the state of johor. nagata junji is a geographer who is studying how different ethnic groups mingle in malaysia. ethnic makeup varies by region. this village is about 80% malay and
. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. [ tires screech ] >> narrator: 2011, on the coast of malaysia, a man named jim eberhart posts an online ad selling his 58-foot yacht -- the infinity. allegedly, no stranger to making a sales pitch, eberhart tells prospective buyers the boat is perfect for cruising the world. when it was built, he says, there was no budget. what buyers might not know is that there's a reason money was once no object. richard ryan, supervisory special agent with the los angeles fbi, says eberhart ran a sham internet-video company that allegedly bilked investors out of millions, then fled the country. >> mr. eberhart's been a fugitive from justice. the investigation shows that he did wire money to hong kong and then, subsequently, singapore, and this could be the way that mr. eberhart has been facilitating his lifestyle as a fugitive. >> narrator: now on the run for more than a decade, eberhart seems to be thumbing his nose at authorities. he's selling the yacht under his real name. is he desperate for cash, or has he just grown bold after years as a fugitive? >> a
by senate the refinery in malaysia. but a group of activists and local residents are against that move. we have this report from malaysia. kayaker from rainforest to refineries, but at what cost? too high, shop these activists. they are fighting plans to open an australian refinery for rare earth minerals pit nearby. gendarme the court is still blocking the project. the government says it has been thoroughly scrutinized and will be stay. hobbies as 17 elements are found in many places. p.j. get these 17 elements are found in many places but all are only refight in china, a messy, polluted prospect. the australian company line s hopes this, largest growers plant outside china will break that monopoly. -- largest rare earth plant outside china. could need up to one-third of a man outside china these essential minerals. the company says it has passed every test every environmental question put to it and it is making the case for two years, yet it has gained very little traction with a local population that simply does not trust the country or malaysian authorities are supposed to regulate it.
east, china, malaysia, the philippines, singapore as well as all over from europe. perhaps from africa and south america. we can learn from that just as we have done with concepts like sunday streets where people take back the streets and start having fun in our urban communities and bringing out the children to enjoy the environment. this is our future generations so we have to have the best ideas. how to keep our environment and our strong. i want to tell you that there are a tremendous amount of enthusiasm for keeping our city grain trade we have at least three different projects that we have been focused on for a number of years. i have had the privilege with working with mohammed and our city engineers to accomplish this. most importantly with our community leaders and volunteers throughout every part of our neighborhoods. i hope that you do you is your time and take advantage of our wonderful weather to go out and do as many doors as possible of all the -- tours as possible of all the community gardens. we have a committee challenge program, one that i am proud to have headed up
out to malaysia for an exclusive interview with the country's prime minister. >>> it's very presidential music to bringis to this topic, which is really dominating the headlines today. president obama and republican rival mitt romney met face to face last night in denver, colorado for their first u.s. presidential debate. it really focused mostly on the economy. with a mnt to onth to go before election, both men had to prove to voters that they're the right man for the country. john harwood got a firsthand view of the debate and filed this report from denver. >> the first of three presidential debates here at the university of denver was a strong one for mitt romney. he came out very aggressively in confronting president obama on his record over the last four years, taking on on the president over his failure to reduce the budget deficit, over job creation, over obamacare, over the regulation of wall street and dodd-frank. had some success in pulling the election back from a choice election as president obama wants to be about their visions going forward into a referendum on
the flotilla and bangladesh and tomorrow we may see malaysia and indonesia and elsewhere enraged about a movie that was made in california. but while rage can spread around the world, rage is a starting point. once you start to analyze what is likely to happen in libya or what is likely to happen in egypt you get very different -- what is liable to happen in syria -- you get very different scenarios based on the legacy of geography. geography shows libya was a vague geographical expression. we are oriented toward greater carthage and tunisia were benghazi towards alexandria and egypt. because it was never a country it can only be governed through the most austere totalitarian means and once that collapsed the we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond greater tripoli. you have a problem of governmental incapacity in libya that cannot deal with the crisis. egypt is different. egypt you have a country that has been an age old cluster of civilization for years. a cohesive community along the nile aware the government has greater bureaucratic and institutional power ev
's floods as well as higher state spend inning malaysia and the philippines are contributing to growth. even so, the bank says the region won't be immune from the negative impact of the european debt crisis, and slowdown in the global economy. >>> indonesia is another of the region's economic rising stars, but workers there aren't happy with growing income inequality. thousands have taken to the street demanding higher pay and better job security. the population of 240 million gives it the largest labor force in southeast asia. many of nose workers want a bigger share of the country's growing wealth. several major labor unions organized demonstrations across the country on wednesday. they boast a combined membership of about 2 million workers. more than 5,000 people holding flags and banners gathered at front gate of an industrial estate near the capital jakarta. the estate is home to a number of factories operated by foreign firms. similar demonstrations in january forced many businesses to suspend operations. wednesday's protests seem to have passed off peacefully amid a large police prese
fee. mcilroy gets a million. today tiger was in malaysia for the cimv classic. on 16 he drains the long putt. woods finished tied for fourth, three strokes back. nick watney won the tiedle. this one is 22 under par. on 18, watney taps in for the victory and wins bay stroke and takes home $1.3 million. and now in the bottom of the first, the giants and tigers are scoreless. >> ama: all right. we're so excited for the game, though. >> one to go. >> ama: you share with us your [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! we got a lotta empty cans. tomato basil, potato with bacon, 80 different kinds... no wonder we're going through this stuff! hey, hon, want some soup? you bet! [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> ama: coming up at 6:00, the state hands down a loss to the san francisco 49ers. why millions of dollars in funding for the new santa clara stadium could be in jeopardy. cashing in on faceback. join us for abc-7 news at 6:00. >>> giants fans
from plant in malaysia this week. thus far, he delivers. a little wet. semi blind pitch shot. measured beautifully. he is fifth place. stay with us. one more check of the standing forecast. i've always been lucky. flew 37 bombing missions over germany. made it home every time. i'm lucky to have good friends who are all still around, and we're all lucky to have a friend named ben. ben's protected our medicare and veterans' benefits. and he's helping my 13 grandchildren afford college. he's my friend, ben. i hope he's your friend, too. i'm ben cardin, and i'm honored to approve this message. and this is maryland. teacher: this is west virginia, pennsylvania, delaware. every year marylanders spend five hundred and fifty million gaming at casinos in these other states. question seven will build a new casino and bring table games to baltimore... generating hundreds of millions for schools. and that money has to go to education. it's the law. so vote for question seven. so we can stop spending all that money here, and keep maryland money in classrooms like mine. >> if it does not come up th
, no trouble, managing trouble spots. led missions to thailand, indonesia and malaysia during the asian currency crisis. i met with him to talk about challenges we fast now and some of those in the future. i want to start talking asian countries, they have really been a bright spot for the global economy. but we are seeing, economies of europe and the u.s. starting to really stagnate. we are seeing a slowdown in china. and india. wondering how much can asia continue to support growth? >> as we see,isha^ kra asia re leader. we expect asia to grow 5.5% this year, rising to 6 poe% this yea above global growth. i would say, you will see demand pick up in asia and keep growing -- growth active and robust. >> speaking of domestic demand, how much will that be able to really shield asian countries, do you think from the global slowdown we are seeing. what do policy makers need to do to ensure that domestic demand continues? >> this is a very important issue. they're dealing with this, two ways to handle this. there is ram oom to build new stimulus on the fiscal side. for many countries, infla
to continue his could play at the classic in malaysia. 7th.7, -- par-3 finished the day at nine under. president obama's remarks the nhl should reach a resolution, they have not. . canceled 13 more games. not good news. teacher: this is west virginia, pennsylvania, delaware. and this is maryland. every year marylanders spend five hundred and fifty million gaming at casinos in these other states. question seven will build a new casino and bring table games to baltimore... generating hundreds of millions for schools. and that money has to go to education. it's the law. so vote for question seven. so we can stop spending all that money here, and keep maryland money in classrooms like mine. prand you're seeing that rightno quit in amnow.a... over five million new jobs. exports up forty one percent. our auto industry... back. and our heroes are comg home. we're not there yet, but we've made real progress and the... last thing we should d do is tun back now. here's my plan for the next four years: making education and training a national priority; building on our manufacturing boom; boosti
that malaysia could pursue. >> if we have an opportunity to i in-vest in canada, of course we will be happy. on the other hand, if canada finds that such investment is not welcome, then we will go to other countries. >> at $5.2 billion, this isn't a blockbuster deal. but if the progress does fall over, it could spell trouble for the $15.1 billion acquisition of maximenergy. the other is the broaden asian angle. canada cannot afford to ignore asia and the massive demand. >> public opinion poll shows a lot of unease, but it's ironic because what the prime minister of canada stephen harper has been in asia recently a couple weeks ago the four premieres were in china. what were they all doing? saying asia you're our market, we want to sell things to you. so it's a two way street here. >> the next step in the story is mr. petromas will sweeten the terms or severimply walk away. >> so are they shooting themselves in the foot? >> i think this is an odd decision on the part of canada. dan yurgin just alluded to it being a market for asian exports. and of course the united states is seeing a resurge
mobs in badly lit megacities at virtually the speed of light. so i was in malaysia seeing a big demonstration against what? against palestine. against the israelis occupation of palestine a malaysian told me that palestine is existential. it's totem i can to muslims. >> rose: so you were in malaysia it could be indonesia, too, the largest muslim population. is that more of a question of religion or geography or when you talk about geography you're talking about religion? >> it's about technology creating new geographical communities where you can have a pan islam. my previous book was about the indian ocean. >> rose: "monsoon" as i remember. >> right and the islam in southeast asia is very different --. >> rose: you talk to them and that's what they tell you. >> but because of technology muslims from one part of the greater middle east to the other part and to the muslim community in southeast asia can now interact with each other and rediscover their faith as a unit rather than a sepate groups. so it creates a new geography of islam. it's still about space so each place interac
it was formed. and while the european economy has stalled, countries like indonesia, malaysia, india and china continue to grow, and at a phenomenal rate. the potential consequences of this shift in power, should we in the west fail to respond, cannot be overstated. our influence in the world, our standard of living, our ability to fund our public services and maintain our culture of openness and tolerance -- all are in the balance. for power would move not only away from the liberal and democratic world, but within it too, from moderates to hard liners, from internationalists to isolationists, from those committed to the politics of cooperation to those hell-bent on confrontation. if history has taught us anything, it is that extremists thrive in tough times. so yes, if we fail to deal with our debts and tackle the weaknesses in our economy, our country will pay a heavy political price. but the human cost would be higher still. not only would we fall behind internationally, we would leave a trail of victims at home too. so to those who ask, incredulously, what we -- the liberal democrats -- a
and probably into the new year before they start buying. we are seeing the emergence of malaysia and demand starting to grow and they are filling in the holes that are left. yoo o >> run of the reasons that the stock went down, they said that there were one time problems involving hurricane isaac and river volumes and rock that need to come from florida. you solved problems or they went away. and the set up of the stock being down doesn't take into account that you may not have any of those problems. >> that is it. those are transient problems. we are not going to likely have weather disruptions. mississippi river. low rates. that is going to pose some problems but it is going to start raining again this fall. it will start again this year and the mississippi will rise and we will find ways to work around. we have trucks, rail and we can get the product to customers. and those things happen. this is an asset and a lot of processes involved. we had a couple of surprised and we dealt with them and we are going to see higher operating costs. >> one of the things threw me in. copply cated story
baseball tonight, game 3 of the world series tomorrow. and finally the second to last stop in malaysia tiger woods was a great shot he gets to go up on the green a shot of 67 and tied for the first place 9 under. one more to go in toand the pga tour is over. >> have a good weekend gentlemen, that will do it for us.
malaysia, philippines, indonesia. indonesia in particular. are going very rapidly. they've been able, very unusually, to decouple their domestic economies from the weakness of exports for various reasons. and those countries, i think if anything, would require stable, if not higher rates. indonesia in particular i think is in danger of overheating and needs higher policy rates rather than lower policy rates. but then you've got the giants of japan and asia. china and india, which are clearly suffering right now and do require some further policy easing. then you've got another group of countries which includes singapore, but also korea and taiwan that are struggling, and that require interest rate cuts. it's very much a mixed bag and i think we need to be careful not to lump asia together in one. they're usually unsynchronized. >> what's also unusual or perhaps just telling is to think back to the role that thailand played as a catalyst in the late '90s. now it appears like this area is almost in some ways a source of strength or at least not an area of contagion. what do you think is prim
in malaysia before going to tunisia, dubai. in all muslim countries, the reaction to the film was different. in malaysia, the you kept on telling me things like, it speaks for itself, there is no reason to defend it. in fact, most of them were showing me a parody of gangnym style. there were more concerned about that. in other countries, they were wondering how they could put out their own views to be proactive. in libya and tunisia, it was much more passionate and defensive. one of the thing that we forgot in the debate is we are talking about transitional countries that have been through trauma, have been destabilized. at the root of the conversation was the question of, everything has been stripped away, we are trying to rebuild our nation. the last thing we have is our dignity. the revolutions in each country brought dignity, and a video hit them there, made them feel humiliated. everyone was talking about protecting the right to speak, but nobody was talking about the right of religion and our own identity. after root of this is the question of identity. religion is very much intertwin
to china malaysia and mexico into what do you want mitt romney to do? >> we basically want mitt romney to come here and explain to us why he's campaigning to create jobs when his company is outsourcing all over the world. >> it is not a new company that came out of nowhere. it's almost 100 years old. it was founded in 1916, and then texas instruments bought it in 1959. then bain capital september in in 2006, and then there is an ipo in 2010 and on schedule to close in 2012. you figure, you know, if a plant is closing things must be terrible. they have to have a reason to close because business must be horrible. look at the profits they made. in 2010 their profits were $592,000. 2011 $660,000. it's just heartbreaking. here are more stories. >> they came in and introduced their transition team. the next bullet on their meeting was by the way by the end of the the 2012 all the jobs will be moved to china. >> we all just--aah. you could hear it in the room. it was just silent the whole time. they were talking away about their company who they were, what they do. >> and then they also info
of their games for november resulting in an estimated $720 million in lost revenue. >>> tiger woods in malaysia playing in the cimb classic where the purse is over $6 million. tiger shot a 67 and is 9-under tied for fifth place with kevin nah five strokes behind the leader through two rounds. [ non-english language ] ♪ [ music ]♪ hibbert is usually known fos all star play on the court.. this bbert took his talents to an indiana mall d caught customers by surprise with >> roy hibbard is usually known for his all-star play on the course but this week he took his talents to an indiana mall and caught customers by surprise with his flash mob south korean pop dance. >> that's so popular at giants games in the sixth ike all the fans are doing it. just really caught on. >> i saw you doing it. >> they were doing it. >> whenever i do it, it's for charity. >> pony up the money. >> i'll tell you. [ laughter ] >> he looked good, graceful. very impressed. >> he practiced. there's some video of him practicing to learn how to do it beforehand. [ laughter ] >> thanks, kim coyle. >> for news throughout the
spoke when pakistan, with bangladesh, with india, with malaysia and i do believe indonesia and ghana and venezuela will be added to the list as well. >> rose: let me ask you this, many people believe and there is some evidence, they say, that you're supplying arms to the government in syria that allows them to continue killing their own people. >> i think that the government of syria doesn't have any problem pros curing arms. and they don't need us for that. >> rose: but are you doing it? >> they have closer associates that can supply them with every kind of weapon. >> rose: but are you supplying them with weapons. >> no. >> you say are you not interfering but iran is interfering by all accounts. you say you want a dialogue but yet you continue to send arms and money, manpower to bash ar assad's forces, while he's killing his own people. are you complicity in that? >> i have answered the question. after all, anyone can accuse anyone. on the international scene, especially in syria. we can accuse you, you can accuse us. >> i'm not accusing-- i'm not accusing anyone, it's the commander
, india, africa, malaysia, indonesia where that middle class has purchasing power and look for those goods where they don't have them today and the u.s. is prime for that if we set our skilled workers the right way, if we can work on a global level playing field and if, in fact, we can be competitive both in terms of customer service and quality. >> let me quickly ask you about income and equality and the disparity between the bottom and the top earners. that's not a uniquely american problem. income inequality has been growing globally over the past decade, and most economists agree that income inequality slows growth. when you're of the mindset to redistribute wealth or let the free markets work, regardless, that is slowing growth. over the past term under president obama income inequality has grown, that disparity has grown more in one year than in 2002 to 2007, five years. what policies can we implement to reduce that disparity and solve the problem of income inequality to get better growth? >> at the end of the day you're on the right issue, because the inequality there today is not g
positioned us where we are strong as an ally of countries. india and malaysia, they were concerned about china. china is going to come up a lot tonight. it's also going to come up on how are you going to deal with the super power that's really causing a lot of strife in the region. >> the thing i will be watching for on choina, is when people talk about the rise of china, they conflate with their economic might. so you get people talking about how they have a huge military. we know nothing about the size of china's military. they are investing a ton less in their military than we are. but in terms of aircraft carriers, they have one that doesn't work yet. and china is a future threat militarily. not necessarily a current threat. >> that's what mitt romney can't speak to at all. >> does the fact that the focus is foreign policy change the strategy and what you try to get done and the way you approach it? >> i think at the opening, it does. but i think that you try to tie it into some of the issues and concerns of the people around domestic issues that feed in. for example, the economy can
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)